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Iceland's Ghosts [Sep. 22nd, 2008|06:02 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts
raven14
Article from Iceland Review:

A couple of weeks ago Eygló wrote her Daily Life about “Iceland's hidden people” and referred to a study concluding that Icelanders are more superstitious than any other people in the Western world.

While I can't personally vouch for the existence of elves and trolls who hide in rocks and hillsides in Iceland (after all, they supposedly remain invisible to humans most of the time), I can tell you about my recent visit to the Ghost Centre in Stokkseyri, south Iceland.

The centre, which is set up as a maze, features Iceland's most famous ghost stories. Upon entry you are given a CD and Discman to help guide you through the 24 tales. The idea is that you are guided around the centre by listening to the stories as you pass certain scenes depicting the environment in which the events took place.

It would spoil the whole experience if I revealed too much about this place but let’s just say that you can literally feel the presence of the “ghosts” around you. And I know I wasn't the only one to scream more than a few times—and that's before the ground started rumbling with a simulated earthquake.

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Myths of the Raven [Sep. 21st, 2008|10:50 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts
raven14


“If the Tower of London ravens are lost or fly away, the Crown will fall and Britain with it.”

In the summer of 2004, I was in London to give a lecture in connection with the exhibition “This much is certain” at the Royal College of Art. Previously, I had researched raven lore, heard the Tower of London raven legend, and wanted to see the Tower ravens first-hand. I came upon the portentous birds just before noon, after seeing an informative display of fake torture instruments in the Bloody Tower. The ravens were to my right, just west of the White Tower. They were gathered by their cages, situated at ground level atop a grassy mound near the ruin of the Wall of the Innermost Ward. A sign was posted: “Warning: Ravens Bite.” An ominous black raven turned my way, croaked, and then casually picked up a stick in her beak.

The Innermost Ward was an enclosed area once reserved for royalty and nobles of the court. The Ward’s crumbling 13th-century rampart wall is pierced by gaping holes that once served as embrasures (narrow slits for arrows). Purportedly, a ghostly figure has been observed glaring through the apertures in the wall – vanishing only to reappear at each hole all along the deteriorating ruin. It is behind this haunted wall that the ghastly ravens make their doleful nests.

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Folktales and Myths of Trees [Sep. 11th, 2008|05:13 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts
raven14
Hi,
This looks like an interesting community. I've always liked folk tales, and was wondering if anyone knew about this link:

Folktales and Myths of Trees

"Folktales are the soul's nourishment...
They keep the flame of possibility alive." --- Rafe Martin

The tales presented here, taken from oral traditon, have been handed down over generations and are offered by Spirit of Trees, to be retold and shared anew. Tell them indoors and out, in classrooms, parks, community centers, hospitals. Play with them; learn from them; use them to teach others.

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Spiral symbolism [Mar. 14th, 2008|01:26 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

lunar_echo
[mood |artisticartistic]



I have been drawn to spirals for some time now. As one of the most ancient universal symbols - it has resonated strongly with my love of ancient shared symbols, found in a variety of contexts across the world. The above being taken from the foundation stone of the site at New Grange, Ireland.



This native american pretroglyph is said to use spirals as a symbol for water...



The Great Serpent Mound located near Locus Grove, Ohio. Built between 100B.C.-700A.D. by what is thought to be the Adena cultures. This scuplted mound of earth is 1348 feet long, 20 feet wide and 2 feet 6 inches high.

The above images were researched with the help of this site.




Painting by Rhonda Eklund

For me, the symbol is so alluring because of its simplicity and its representation of dynamic movement, of nature's powerful cycles and patterns. The rise and flow of energy. The consistency of movement.
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Calling all folklorists and dreamers... [Mar. 14th, 2008|01:05 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

lunar_echo
[mood |curiouscurious]

...As the co-creator of this community almost 2 years ago, I wandered over here to see if anything has changed and developed in my absence. I see there are a fair few new members, but no posts as yet. If any of you are interested in giving this community new life - I'd be keen to share ideas with you.

Or, simply, anything folkloric or mythical that has captured your imagination of late...something new, unusual or particularly important to you. A story. An image, A symbol or custom.


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Interviews with Tarot Reader Rachel Pollack [May. 12th, 2006|06:41 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

lunar_echo
[mood |creativecreative]
[music |Tori Amos: God]

This lady is an inspiring woman. She wrote the excellent book to my first ever & most favoured deck of 7 years: The Haindl Deck. I feel through my use of the tarot, and in sharing it with others, I have learnt some interesting things & shared some unique experiences/conversations with those around me.

Just for random interest - a couple of interviews with her. Does anyone know of her written work? I am considering buying more of her books.

http://www.aeclectic.net/tarot/learn/interview_rpollack.shtml

http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/16969/97770

"Because it’s basic nature is that you can mix and rearrange it, Tarot's deepest message is about the openness of possibilities. More specifically, it’s the story of souls journey, from birth to enlightenment."

-Rachel Pollack
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The siginificance of bees [May. 1st, 2006|03:58 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

lily_la_mer
[mood |cheerfulcheerful]

I was not so familiar with the symbolism of bees until this week. I don't know how I ever missed that.

Thanks to an LJ friend who pointed out a very strange source of inspiration, the website for the American TV show 'Ghost Whisperer', which featured symbolic art made from dream imagery involving the characters and plots of the show with bees incorporated into the symbolism by the artist to represent the bridge between two worlds. That led me to look this up (quickly, Wikipedia, hey, it's still a great source of information) and I think it's fascinating!


Bee (mythology)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the ancient Near East and throughout the Aegean world, bees were seen as a bridge between the natural world and the underworld. Bees were carved on tombs. The Mycenaean tholos tombs even took the form of beehives.

Hyrai in Boeotia, Greece, the birthplace of Orion, was an ancient place mentioned in Homer's catalogue of the ships that set forth to fetch Helen home from Troy. Like some other archaic names of Greek cities, such as Athens or Mycenae, Hyrai is plural, a name that once had evoked the place of "the sisters of the beehive."

Winged, armed with toxin, creators of the fermentable honey, seemingly parthenogenetic in their immortal hive, bees were emblems of Potnia, the Minoan-Mycenaean "Mistress" older than Demeter, who might sometimes be called "the pure Mother Bee." Other Hellenic embodiments of the Great Mother: Cybele, Rhea the Earth Mother, and the archaic Artemis as she was honored at Ephesus. Pindar remembered that the Pythian pre-Olympic priestess of Delphi remained "the Delphic bee" long after Apollo had usurped the ancient oracle and shrine. The Homeric Hymn to Apollo acknowledges that Apollo's gift of prophecy first came to him from three bee-maidens.

Bee-keeping was a Minoan craft, and the fermented honey-drink was the old Cretan intoxicant, older than wine. The proto-Greek invaders did not bring the art of bee-keeping with them. Homer saw bees as wild, never tame, as when the Achaeans issued forth from their ship encampment "like buzzing swarms of bees that come out in relays from a hollow rock" (Iliad, book II). Long after Knossos fell, for two thousand years, the classical Greek tongue preserved "honey-intoxicated" as the phrase for "drunken."

Main article: Merope.

The name "Merope" seems to mean "honey-faced" in Greek, thus "eloquent," but surely at an earlier level her "face" was a bee-mask. Cretan bee-masked priestesses appear on Minoan seals. One of the mythographers recalled the tradition that "Merope" was the "bee-eater" in the old Minoan tongue, before the Hellenes came to the Aegean.

This name Merope figures in too many isolated tales for "Merope" to be an individual. Instead the "Merope" must denote a position as priestess of the Goddess. But surely Merope the "bee-eater" is unlikely to be always a bee herself. Though there is a small Mediterranean bird called the Bee-Eater, which was known under that name to Roman naturalists Pliny and Aelian, this Bee-Eater is most likely to have been a She-Bear, a representative of Artemis. The goddess was pictured primitively with a she-bear's head herself, and the bear remained sacred to Artemis into classical times. At a festival called the Brauronia, pre-pubescent girls were dressed in honey-colored yellow robes and taught to perform a bear dance. Once they had briefly served Artemis in this way, they would be ready to be married. In later times, a Syriac Book of Medicine recommends that the eye of a bear, placed in a hive, makes the bees prosper. The bear's spirit apparently watches over the hive, and this was precisely the Merope's role among the Hyrai at Chios.
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Meeting with the Goddess [Apr. 30th, 2006|06:21 am]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

qaexl
Funny, synchronicities strikes again. I had promised to post this up here, and when I do, someone had posted about Tara. This posting is about a part of the Hero's Journey, "The Meeting With the Goddess", of which Isis, Tara, et. al. takes various forms as the World Mother. Read more...Collapse )

Namaste
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Mahacinatara or Tara of Tibet [Apr. 30th, 2006|02:57 am]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

lily_la_mer
[mood |workingworking]

ISIS:The Supreme Manifestation of the Earth Mother.

I've been doing a lot of research into the corresponding myths of Isis from various cultures for a story I'm writing and came across these Tibetan artworks with related imagery that really struck me. I also happened upon this photo of Bjork later that day, and she just seemed to fit right in with these. two paintings after the cutCollapse )
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Interestingly enough, I've been researching Tibetan medicine, myths, and history for months and these Isis related images popped up on a random tourism site for hikes in Tibet. There were no artist credits to the paintings on the site.
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Edshu [Apr. 22nd, 2006|03:16 pm]
Mythical Realms: Folklore & Mythological Arts

qaexl
The difficult point is made vivid in an anecdote from Yorubaland (West Africa), which is told of the trickster-divinity Edshu. One day, this odd god came walking along a path between two fields. "He beheld in either field a farmer at work and proposed To play the two a turn. He donned a hat that was on one side red but on the other white, green before and black behind (these being the colors of the four World Directions: i.e., Edshu was a personification of the Center, the axis mundi, or the World Navel); so that when the two friendly farmers had gone home to their village and the one had said to the other, 'Did you see that old fellow go by today in the white hat?' the other replied, 'Why, the hat was red.' To which the first retorted, 'It was not; it was white.' 'But it was red,' insisted the friend, 'I saw it with my own eyes.' 'Well, you must be blind,' declared the first. 'You must be drunk,' rejoined the other. And so the argument developed and the two came to blows. When they began to knife each other, they were brought by neighbors before the headman for judgement. Edshu was among the crowd at the trial, and when the headman sat at a loss to know where justice lay, the old trickster revealed himself, made known his prank, and showed the hat. 'The two could not help but quarrel,' he said. 'I wanted it that way. Spreading strife is my greatest joy.'(57)

Where the moralist whould be filled with indignation and the tragic poet with pity and terror, mythology breaks the whole of life into a vast, horrendous Divine Comedy. Its Olympian laugh is not escapist in the least, but hard, with the hardness of God, the Creator. Mythology, in this respect, makes the tragic attitude seem somewhat hysterical, and the merely moral judgment shortsighted. Yet the hardness is balanced by an assurance that all that we see is but the reflex of a power that endures, untouched by the pain. Thus the tales are both pitiless and terrorless -- suffused with the joy of a transcendent anonymity regarding itself in all of the self-centered, battling egos that are born and die in time.


--- Joseph Campbell. The Hero with a Thousand Faces

Namaste
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